Category: Winter

Beetroot & Black Bean Burgers

We love eating by the seasons and seeing how the passing of the year brings a whole different array of food to our tables. Living in the heart of a city I particularly love the connection my local veg box gives me to the changing seasons, weather and produce. There’s nothing like a wet, muddy carrot to spark the connection between the weather we’re having to the food that’s growing, or maybe that’s just me… vegetable romantic?

At this time of year, when the winter veg starts running out and the new season crops haven’t quite kicked in, it can seem like there isn’t that much exciting produce around. For sure there are plenty of greens to be had but when it’s still decidedly wintery outside, it can be hard to get excited about salad and I actually LOVE salad. But I don’t see this as the down-side to eating by the seasons. I see it as the fun, challenging side. How can I make the most delicious, satisfying, yummy meal out of a cabbage…. uh hello Winter Veg Stir-fry!

In fact I’ve actually had people say to me, oh yeah it seemed good getting a local veg box at first but then we just ended up getting loads of beetroot and just didn’t really know what to do with it. Well it just so happens that we bloody love beetroot (is that some kind of beetroot joke there, blood… who knows) and we don’t want beetroot putting anyone off eating seasonally!

We really do love it, just check out these recipes…

Chocolate Beetroot Cake
Roasted Beetroot & Raw Green Salad
Roasted Beetroot Rissotto
Celeriac & Marinated Beetroot Salad
Vegetable Crisps

So I wanted to share a really exciting, super delicious, hearty recipe to inspire those who might think eating seasonally is boring and restrictive and show that it is exciting and most importantly delicious! 

Beetroot-and-black-bean-burgers Vegan-beetroot-burgers

Beetroot & Black Bean Burgers
Makes 8 burgers

3 large beetroot (approx. 650g)
1 cup uncooked black beans
150g oats
1 tsp sweet paprika
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dill

Serving options:
bread rolls
salad leaves
alfafa sprouts
fried onions
fried chestnut mushrooms 

  • Soak the black beans overnight in double their volume of water. (I often don’t plan ahead to do organised stuff like this so just cook them for double the amount of time).
  • Rinse and drain the beans and place them with fresh water in a saucepan. Cook on a medium heat, covered for 1 hour until tender and soft.
  • Once your beans have started cooking, pre-heat the oven to 180C before peeling and chopping the beetroot. Place in a baking tray, drizzle with a little oil, sprinkle with the dill and season with salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly and cover with foil, roast for 45 minutes then set aside to cool slightly. 
  • When the beans are cooked drain them and run under cold water to cool. Add them to a food processor with the beetroot, oats and spices. Pulse for a couple of minutes, scraping down the sides regularly until you have a fairly smooth consistency.
  • Shape into burgers and place on a lightly oiled baking tray. Place in the fridge for 30 minutes which help gives them a firmer consistency. You can skip this step if you don’t mind them a little squishy, or are really hungry.
  • Bake in the oven for 25 minutes at 180C, flipping hallway through. Serve in bun with toppings of your choice and a large side salad. Or skip the gluten and serve with sweet potato wedges.

Amy x 

Oat Flour, Apple Pancakes

Somehow January seems to have drifted into mid-February and it’s only just now, sitting down to write, that I’ve realised. Like the onset of that really fine rain that you don’t notice until you’ve been walking for twenty minutes and suddenly realise you’re soaked through.  

Pancake day has come and gone, along with Valentine’s Day. I feel like I’ve barely had time to even think about making pancakes or how a day of forced romance and red roses makes me queazy. 

The year has just jumped into full swing as if those quiet Christmas evenings sat around the tree never happened. I’m back at work, busy as ever, back commuting up to Manchester one day a week. Trying to keep on top of making packed lunches, daily stretches and exercises, mindfulness practice and getting to bed on time. Oh and I’ve missed out one thing, watching series two of Forbrydelsen aka The Killing. I’m managing (just about) although it always seems to be bedtime that slips. So now I blame myself for having a sore throat and a sniffily nose, after all there were only so many weeks elderberry tincture and echinacea tea could hold off a cold. Turns out its five. 

On the upside it gave me the chance to use a newly learned phrase from my Thursday visits up north. I explained to my Yorkshire boyfriend that “I’m full of cold” whilst feeling pleased but snotty. It got me out of the Saturday morning food shop and I stayed at home in the warm reading my new favourite book, Quiet

Truth be told, I did actually manage to whip up some pancakes on the appropriate day. However my lack of preparation and empty cupboards meant I had to make do without my favourite vegan pancake flour, buckwheat. Instead I made Oat Flour Griddle Cakes from Thug Kitchen. They make for a hefty, satisfying American pancake, not a crepe-type lemon and sugar number. So I thought I’d share my adapted recipe on the off chance your cupboard is also lacking in stoneground buckwheat flour : )

They’re the perfect answer to pancakes when the day springs itself upon you and all you have in the cupboard are oats.

Oat-flour-pancakes Vegan-gluten-free-pancakes

Oat Flour, Apple Pancakes

125g Porridge oats
2 tbsp Ground flax seeds + 6 tbsp water
40g Porridge oats
1 1/2 tsp Baking powder
1 tbsp Coconut Sugar
1 tsp Ground cinnamon
1/4 cup Unsweetened apple sauce (or 2 small apples)
1 cup Non-dairy milk
Coconut oil for frying

For topping:
Maple syrup
Apple sauce
Ground cinnamon

  • If making the apple sauce from scratch, peel and finely dice 2 small apples and place in a small saucepan with 3-4 tbsp water. Cook on a medium heat for around 15 minutes and stir regularly, adding a little extra water if necessary until the apple has broken down and you have a good consistency. 
  • Whisk the ground flax seed and water together with a fork in a small bowl and set aside.
  • Grind 125g oats in a food processor for a few minutes until you have a fine flour.
  • Mix together the ground oats and remaining dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  • Put a large frying pan on to a high heat so you’re ready to start frying straight away.
  • Make a well in the dry ingredients and add in the flax mixture, milk and 1/4 cup of apple sauce, leaving the remaining for topping. Mix together until just combined.
  • Add 1 tsp coconut oil to the pan, then spoon in just under 1/2 cup of the batter. You should be able to fit 3 pancakes the pan at a time. Fry for a few minutes until they start to brown and then flip using a spatula and fry for another couple of minutes until brown.
  • Keep warm under a grill whilst you fry the remaining pancakes.
  • Serve straight away with maple syrup, apple sauce and a sprinkle of ground cinnamon.

Homemade Baked Beans & Hash Browns with Wilted Chard

I feel like I never get a chance to enjoy breakfast. I see all these pictures over on IG, mainly full of neatly stacked pancakes, perfectly positioned smoothie bowls and tasty looking porridge. I know this may sound slightly odd if you follow our account on Instagram, you’re likely to find images matching that description. Full disclosure, it is Amy who mainly takes the photos you see over on our feed, yep she lives an Instagrammable life, well she doesn’t really, I’ve seen her flat, do such lives actually exist? 

Let’s talk real. The reality of my breakfasts in the week are throwing some oats in a bowl with some water, (I don’t like my porridge with milk – non dairy obvs) chucking it in the microwave at work and hoping it will turn into some form of porridge that’s not too lumpy, and maybe I’ll chuck a banana on it or some granola, nothing worth taking a well lit photo of.

When it comes to the weekend that’s when the pancakes could be happening, but they don’t – I have to get out to walk the dog or I’ve got to get my porridge down me quickly so I can get out for my long training run so the whole day doesn’t disappear. But, this weekend I made time for breakfast. A proper breakfast. One to take my time over, to enjoy properly.

hash-browns-and-baked-beans
Homemade Baked Beans & Hash Browns with Wilted Chard 

For the hash browns:
2 potatoes
1 onion
1 tspn turmeric
1 tspn cumin seeds
Salt and pepper
Coconut oil

For the baked beans:
1 tin of haricot beans
1 tins of borlotti beans
1 tin of chopped tomatoes
1 onion
1 clover of garlic
1 tspn cumin
1 tspn paprika
A couple of dashes of tabasco
1 tspn chilli powder 
Salt and pepper

  • Grate the potatoes and squeeze all the water out of them.
  • Thinly slice the onion and mix together with the grated potato.
  • Stir through the turmeric, cumin seeds and season with salt and pepper.
  • In a frying pan, melt the coconut oil on quite a high heat and place heaped spoonfuls of the potato mix into the pan (you can probably cook about 3 or 4 at a time). Flatten them out into patties using a spatula.
  • Once they have cooked on one side turn the hash browns over, the cooked side should stick together. Once they are done, put them on a dish and keep them warm under the grill as you cook the rest of the mixture.
  • Thinly slice the onion, melt the coconut oil in a saucepan and slowly cook the onions. Add the beans and spices to the pan along with the tomatoes.
  • Slowly bring them to the boil and then simmer gently for 15-20 minutes. Add the tabasco and some chilli powder.
  • In another pan, add the chard and cover with boiling water. Simmer for 5 minutes until wilted, then drain any excess water.

Weekends aren’t always those lazy, foodies filled ones we see. But, I’m definitely going to try and slow them down somewhat and make them more enjoyable.

Happy brunching!

Veronica x

Winter Vegetable Stir-fry

Happy new year! I’m sure most of us are currently knee deep in resolutions, detoxes and all things puritanical or have you given in already? After all the Christmas indulging and the hope of a new year it’s understandable why we feel the need to start afresh and try to be the best us we can be, even if we know our good intentions will only last for a few weeks. So in the spirit of the new year, new you thing, let’s try to think of some things that aren’t too restrictive and are small changes that make a positive impact on not only your life but others too.

Stir-fry

Have you heard of Veganuary? It’s when you go vegan for the month of January. We think it’s a great idea and fully support people that sign up for it (it’s not too late to sign up)! But, maybe you’re not ready to go vegan for a whole month and it all seems a little too daunting. Why not try one day a week, then two, then three….you get the idea? Or try cutting down on your cheese intake, maybe replace your dairy milk with a dairy-free alternative…baby steps.

Sign up for a local veg box scheme, we’re always banging on about how great they are, so maybe now is the time to get some awesome seasonal organic veggies into your life? 

Do you struggle to cook from scratch and know you’re eating too much processed rubbish? Set a day aside a week, where you make a meal from scratch, where you know exactly what has gone into it, no hidden sugars, not full of salt and way more tasty. We’ve got loads of ideas for you in our recipe section and I’ve got a super yummy stir-fry for you this week, that you can make in 15 minutes flat.

stir-fry

Winter Vegetable Stir-fry
Serves 2

1 tbsp coconut oil
6 leaves of savoy cabbage
1 onion
1 leek
2 cloves of garlic
1 chilli (chopped)
1 thumb piece of ginger (grated)
1/2 lime juice
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp sesame seeds
Dried chilli flakes
Drizzle of sesame oil
2 x bundles buckwheat soba noodles

I find the key to a great stir fry is the prep – get all your vegetables chopped and ready to go, because then we can cook quickly!

  • In a pan melt the coconut oil over a medium heat, in a seperate pan bring some water to the boil (for your noodles). Once the water is boiled cook the noodles for as long as the instructions say (mine take about 6 minutes).
  • Once the coconut oil is melted, add the onions and garlic and cook for a couple of minutes. Turn the heat up and add the cabbage and leek, making sure to stir frequently. Add the ginger, soy sauce, lime juice and chilli and cook and stir thoroughly. If your heat is high, you should only need to cook for a maximum of 5 minutes.
  • When your noodles are cooked serve in a dish alongside the cabbage stir fry, drizzle with sesame oil, some more sesame seeds and dried chilli flakes.

Super simple, super tasty.

Here’s to an awesome, healthy 2016!

Veronica x

Sage & Chestnut Patties with Parsnip Bacon

Parsnip-Bacon

We’ve been having a pretty relaxing few days, even cooking two Christmas dinners we’ve managed to stay calm (apart from when Mum poured cashew cheese over the Christmas pudding instead of cashew cream!). Whilst we’ve been enjoying lots of delicious festive food like these cheese and crackers, these brussels and this Christmas cake, we haven’t really been over indulging.

Veronica is still struggling with her Candida and is trying to stay as sugar-free as she can manage over the festive period. She’s also started her marathon training. I on the other hand have been out of action with a bad knee for weeks and have only just started being able to do yoga again. I’m itching to get back on my bike and am gutted not to be able to go out running with Veronica whilst I’m back home. So I’ve been trying not to over indulge so I don’t make myself feel anymore sluggish than I already do. 

So how to indulge without over indulging? For me that means making delicious food that I wouldn’t normally go to the trouble of making or trying out new and exciting recipes. This recipe is exactly that. You’ve probably seen coconut bacon floating round pintrest and blogs over the past year. I’ve been dreaming about topping my Christmas dinner with parsnip crisps in the way we used to put streaky bacon on the turkey before we were vegan. So when I saw this coconut bacon over on Top with Cinnamon with the extra addition of miso paste, I knew what had to be done… parsnip bacon! And what to top with parsnip bacon, sage and chestnut patties.

These patties make the perfect festive inspired meal without leaving you in a festive food coma. Served with the crispy parsnip bacon they remind me of deconstructed pigs in blankets, sans cruelty of course! The cauliflower mash is creamy and delicious without the heaviness of potatoes. Serve with some steamed greens and some chutney or gravy and you’ve got yourself one delicious dinner!

Sage-&-Chestnut-Patties 

Sage & Chestnut Patties with Parsnip Bacon and Cauliflower Mash

Serves 4

For the patties:
420g Whole chestnuts
150g Puy lentils
2 tbsp Dried sage
1 tbsp Flax seeds + 3 tbsp water
1 tbsp Vegan bouillon + 100ml water
Pinch of cumin
Polenta for coating

  • Pre-heat the oven to 170C, cut a cross in the shell of each chestnut and roast them for 30 minutes.
  • Rinse the lentils, bring them to a boil in a saucepan of water and simmer for 20 mins until tender then drain.
  • Grind the flax seeds and mix them together with the water and set aside to thicken.
  • Once the chestnuts are roasted, take them out of the oven and leave them to cool before shelling them.
  • Put the chestnuts into a blender and blitz until roughly chopped. Add the cooked lentils, flax mixture and remaking ingredients and blitz together. Season with salt and pepper and shape into 8 patties.
  • Sprinkle a plate with polenta and coat the patties. Leave them on the plate and chill them in the fridge for at leaf 30 minute before cooking.
  • Fry in a little coconut oil in a large frying pan on a medium-high heat for 10 minutes on each side until browned and hot through.

For the parsnip bacon:
Recipe adapted from Izy Hossack.

1 tbsp Miso paste
2 tbsp Rice syrup
1 tsp Smoked paprika
1 tsp Sweet paprika
1 tbsp Soy sauce
1 tbsp Coconut oil (melted)
2-3 Parsnips

  • Measure all the ingredients into a large bowl and mix together well, set aside.
  • Wash and peel the parsnips and trim the ends. 
  • Then peel the parsnip into thin strips using a peeler.
  • Add the parsnips to the bowl and mix together to ensure they are all well coated.
  • Lay the parsnip strips out onto a baking tray lined with greaseproof paper and bake at 170C for 20mins, checking and turning every 5 minutes to ensure they don’t burn.
  • Remove from the oven and they should crisp slightly more as they cool.

For the cauliflower mash:
1 Cauliflower (approx. 650g)
50ml Non-dairy milk
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 tsp Nutritional yeast

  • Boil the cauliflower for approx. 12 minutes on a medium heat until tender but not overcooked, remove from the heat and drain.
  • Place back in the saucepan with the remaining ingredients and season with salt and pepper. Using a stick blender, blitz the cauliflower until you get a silky, smooth mash. Serve immediately.

Enjoy the remaining festivities and we’ll see you in the new year!

Amy x

Chestnut Stuffed Squash

It’s easy to get overwhelmed thinking of all the things you need to do in the lead up to Christmas. Making gifts, buying gifts, wrapping gifts. Attending numerous Christmas parties, planning festive recipes, making, buying and wrapping even more gifts. So two weeks back, before Christmas-mode got into full swing, I escaped city life for a few days in the New Forest.

IMG_4870

Cue hats, gloves, scarves and walking boots. Jumping over streams, walking on fallen trees. Long lunches. Dark afternoons spent in cosy pubs lit by candles and heated by open fires. Yep you get it, the perfect winter break. Perfect that is, if you aren’t vegan.

IMG_4863new forest

I finally got it. This is why my boyfriend, and no doubt countless others don’t want to make the commitment to veganism. It’s not because they don’t agree with the environmental and ethical view points. It’s not because they don’t enjoy delicious and satisfying vegan food. It’s because it’s unbelievably frustrating going out for food and paying good money for completely uninspiring and sometimes frankly, tasteless food. 

Don’t get me wrong, I’ve had great experiences eating out, even in places that aren’t particularly vegetarian friendly, let alone vegan friendly. It’s just that that weekend I had a string of awful meals, one after another, after another. One of the main problems was that the vegetarian options on offer were cheese based and because they were pre-made could not be adapted and made vegan. The problem with the vegetarian options that could be adapted was that they completely lacked the thought and attention that the meat and fish options had clearly been given. And I suspected that the chefs making them would never eat those dishes themselves.

Ok rant over. But my point being, that if I wasn’t as passionately committed to my vegan lifestyle choice as I am, I wouldn’t want to pay to eat a half arsed, tasteless meal whilst everyone around me is tucking into a carefully prepared, deliciously balanced, flavour-packed meals. 

IMG_4854

So maybe the restaurant sector still has a way to go to offer and tempt people (ie. my boyfriend) to choose to pay for a vegan meal. And whilst it can seem like a massive commitment to alter your diet and have to start explaining to waiters or your friends that no you don’t eat fish or cheese or honey, it is easier to start at home. 

Buying fresh, whole ingredients and making yourself delicious flavour packed vegan meals is so easy. And at this festive time of year when we’re being bombarded with pictures of giant joints of roast meat, there are super tasty alternatives that capture the spirit and flavours of the season without harming animals, contributing to climate change and whilst benefitting your health.

This chestnut stuffed squash is exactly that.

Stuffed-SquashChestnut-Stuffed-SquashRoast-squash

Chestnut Stuffed Squash

Serves 4

2 small squash (eg. acorn, red kuri, harlequin)
200g cooked chestnuts
75g puy lentils
Rapeseed oil
1 red onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1/4 tsp dried thyme
1/4 tsp dried sage

  • Preheat the oven to 180C.
  • Cut both the squash in half, scoop out the seeds and place on a baking tray. Drizzle over a little oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 30 minutes.
  • Meanwhile prepare the chestnut filling. Rinse the lentils in a sieve then bring them to a boil in a saucepan before reducing the heat and simmering for approximately 20 minutes. They should be soft but still have a little bite to them.
  • Whilst the lentils are cooking chop the onion and fry in a little oil on a medium heat in a frying pan until they start to caramelise.
  • Roughly chop the cooked chestnuts into small chances. Add the dried herbs and garlic to the onions and stir through before adding the cooked lentils and chopped chestnuts. Cook for 5 minutes.
  • Take the squash out the oven and spoon the chestnut filling equally between the squash halves. Cover with foil and the squash back in the oven for 20 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven. Serve with a side of steamed greens or as the centre piece of your festive feast.

 

 

 

 

Warm Brussels Sprout & Pomegranate Salad

Two things, brussels sprouts and pomegranates. First the sprouts. Yes, that’s right, sprout season is here which means of course, it’s f-ing Christmas! Which I’m actually really excited about and am totally ready to embrace, even though it’s only November… but I need something, anything to get me through these cold dark, days!! Secondly, pomegranates. Yep, not so seasonal. Well not to aforementioned cold, dark Britain. But it’s like having a clementine in your Christmas stocking, sometimes you just need something exotic to brighten up your lump of coal…

(Actually there is a third thing… I did not know they are called brussels sprouts. I thought it was brussel sprouts and now I’m totally freaking out…)

Pomegranate

Anyway, no, I’m not saying that brussels sprouts are like coal. I love them! Just not how my Mum used to cook them, sorry Mum! November, for me, is a tough month. It’s dark, like all the time. If I don’t go out at lunch time I’ll pretty much never see the light of day. The beautiful colours of Autumn have all been blown off the trees and everything has turned kinda grey-brown. And unless some snow comes our way, things are gonna be grey-brown for a long time!

WarmBrussel&PomegranateSalad

So I need a little sparkle in my salad. A little festive cheer to get me through the day. And what better than a pomegranate! If you check the label you should be able to find some in the shops from the not-so-far-away Egypt or Turkey… I know, but it’s better than Peru or China!

Brussel-&-Pomegranate-Salad

And yes, now that Veronica and I have taken over Christmas dinner duties, we no longer serve our brussels boiled. (Again, sorry Mum! She’s literally going to kill me, or at the very least give me an evil stare which is possibly worse.) Frying them or roasting them is the way to go. Plus, now we both get seasonal veg boxes every week, sprouts are no longer just a thing for Christmas day. Oh no, the sprout season in the UK can run from September to February. That’s a whole lotta sprouts!

This simple recipe works great as a side for a roast, or yes Christmas dinner. Or cook up a little quinoa and stir it through to make it a delicious meal all on its own. (British grown quinoa of course!)

Warm Brussels Sprouts & Pomegranate Salad

350g Brussels Sprouts
1 Onion or 1/2 a Leek
1 Small Garlic Clove
Half a Pomegranate 
3 tbsp Chopped Walnuts
1/2 tbsp Rapeseed Oil

For the dressing

1 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp white wine vinegar
1 tsp maple syrup 
Pinch of all spice
Pinch of cinnamon

  • Trim the base of the brussels and peel off the outer layers, wash and half them.
  • Heat a frying pan to a high heat and toast the walnuts for a few minutes, remove from the pan and set aside in a bowl. 
  • Add the brussels to the pan, turn down the heat slightly and add a few tablespoons of water to the pan to slightly steam them. Meanwhile slice the onion or leek. Once the water has boiled, add the onions and turn up the heat again. Keep stirring whilst you fry on a high heat until the onions and brussels begin to brown.
  • Add the garlic and stir through for a minute. Transfer the brussels into a serving bowl along with the toasted walnuts and leave to cool slightly.
  • In a small bowl or cup mix together the ingredients for the dressing and pour over the brussels.
  • Cut the pomegranate in half across the middle. Hold half the pomegranate cut side down over a large bowl. Bash the skin like crazy with a spoon until all the seeds fall out into the bowl.
  • Sprinkle the pomegranate seeds over the brussels and serve warm.

So get out your frying pan out and tell November to do one, we want Christmas!

Amy x

(Last of the) Winter Root Vegetable Tagine

Vegan tagine

We may only just have stepped into March but it seems Spring really is upon us. Hayley’s post last week showed the first crocuses opening up to the warming sun and now the daffodils are just waiting burst into life. I certainly can’t deny the excitement of the new life that Spring brings but it’s not all good news…

Food-wise March is when the Winter crops start to come to an end but there’s not much in the way of new crops ready to harvest, cue the Hungry gap. Around this time last year I shared this delicious roasted cauliflower and chickpea salad to celebrate the last of the Winter brassicas. This year to celebrate the end of Winter I’ve got a delicious and warming root vegetable tagine to get us through the last (hopefully) of the cold Winter days.

Winter root veg tagine

I used what root veg I had to hand from my organic vegetable box delivery but you could use whatever you happen to have. I think parsnips and carrots are a must but celeriac or swede can work well if you don’t have squash or jerusalem artichokes. The only thing to be mindful of is the different cooking times, I find parsnips and jerusalem artichokes tend to take a bit longer than squash so either get these in first and the others 5-10 miuntes later or chop them that bit smaller.

Root vegetable tagine

Winter Root Vegetable Tagine

3 parsnips
2 carrots
2 jerusalem artichokes
2 golden nugget squash
1 onion
2 cloves garlic
Thumb sized piece of ginger
1 tsp maple syrup
75g dates
1 tin of tomoatoes
1 tin of chickpeas
1/2 pint of vegetable stock
1 tbsp olive oil

1 tbsp ground cinnamon
2 tsp tumeric
1 tsp ground cumin
2 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp cayenne pepper
Pinch of saffron

  • Finely chop the onion and gently fry in a large pan with the olive oil and garlic until soft and starting to brown.
  • Add the chopped ginger and spices (leaving the saffron for now) and fry for a few minutes until the oil starts to release from the spices. Add a tablespoon or so of water to the pan and stir to make the mixture a paste.
  • Pour in the tin of tomatoes, stir and leave on a medium-high heat until the tomatoes have cooked right down and most of the water has evaporated.
  • Meanwhile chop all the root root vegetables into bite sized cubes and pit and halve the dates.
  • Add them to the reduced tomatoes along with the remaining ingredients including the saffron. The stock should just about cover all the vegetables, add a little extra water to cover if needs be. Bring to a gentle boil then reduce the heat and cook on the hob on a medium-low heat for 30-40minutes until all the vegetables are tender. The longer the better!
  • Serve with couscous or quinoa for a delicious and hearty meal.

Amy x

 

 

 

 

Cinnamon & Raisin, Gluten-free Pancakes

Just in case you hadn’t noticed last Tuesday was Shrove Tuesday, better known as Pancake Day! I have recently become pancake obsessed and love nothing more than having them at the weekend for breakfast or lunch, or dessert, or for a snack! Hah, told you, obsessed! So I certainly wasn’t going to miss out on having pancakes on their very own day just because I normally can’t summon the energy to make them mid-week.

I had a big old bag of buckwheat flour that had been sitting in my cupboard unused for a while so thought it was about time I put it to use and that’s when I threw together this batter and it just so happened to make the best pancakes I have ever made! I was so pleased with myself I have made them twice since, partly just to check it wasn’t a fluke… but it wasn’t! Who knew, vegan, gluten-free, sugar-free pancakes could be so awesome.

Now, no pancake set up would be complete without a delicious topping. Mine normally range from something as basic as lemon juice, to mashed banana and maple syrup or a fruit compôte. So I decided to use up the last of my frozen berry stash which I picked last summer and make this yummy compôte to drizzle over them. After all, Spring is on its way right…

vegan cinnamon pancakes

pancakes with berry compote

vegan pancakes

Cinnamon and raisin, vegan, gluten-free pancakes
Makes 6 large pancakes

1/2 cup raisins
2 tbsp flax seeds
90 ml water
1/2 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 cup brown rice flour
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground allspice
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
1 cup almond milk
Coconut oil for frying

Frozen summer berry compôte

1 cup frozen berries (I used red currants and raspberries)
1 tbsp maple syrup

  • Soak the raisins in a small bowl of warm water and set aside.
  • Finely grind the flax seeds in a spice grinder or high-speed food processor, whisk together with the water in a small bowl and set aside. The mixture should become gloopy and gelatinous.
  • Mix the remaining dry ingredients together in a large mixing bowl. Before you mix in the wet ingredients, begin heating a frying pan on a medium-high heat and put the frozen berries in a small saucepan on a low heat. Stir occasionally and add in the maple syrup whilst you continue making the pancakes.
  • Make a well in the dry ingredients and pour in the flax mixture and half the almond milk. Using a fork mix together the flax and milk and slowly begin to incorporate the flour. Add the remaining milk a bit at a time until everything is combined.
  • Put 1/2 tsp or so of coconut oil in the hot frying pan and pour in just under half a cup of the pancake batter. Fry for about 2 minutes until the bottom has browned nicely then flip and further for a further minute or two.
  • Keep the pancakes warm under the grill until you have fried them all. Serve warm with the berry compôte.

Enjoy! A x

Celeriac & Marinated Beetroot Salad

Marinated-beetroot-salad

It’s been so cold here lately that all I’ve been eating is soups and stews. It’s the kind of weather where even two pairs of gloves won’t keep your hands warm and your skin is constantly dry no matter how much shea butter you apply.

So why then, I here you ask, am I posting a salad recipe? Good question…

Beetroot-and-celaric-salad

Because I miss summer!!!! I miss it so much! Bring back the warmth of the sun please!!

Ok, I’m being a bit dramatic but I know you all feel my pain! The other reason is that this week I got a surprise bag of British watercress in my veg bag, which I wasn’t expecting at this time of year. And then I was like, wooaahh, remember when it was warm and sunny and all I ate was salads. I miss those days.

So bring a little green, fresh, tangy, salady joy to these cold winter days. Then have a cup of tea to warm yourself back up : )

Beetroot-and-celaric-winter-salad

Celeriac and marinated beetroot salad

2 medium sized beetroot
1/2 a small celeriac
1 bunch watercress
2 tbsp chopped walnuts

For the marinade:
2 tbsp white wine vinegar
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp olive oil

  • Peel and chop the beetroot into large chunks.
  • Wrap the chopped beetroot in foil, seasoned with a little olive oil and salt and pepper and roast at 180C for 30 minutes or until a knife easily cuts in.
  • Leave the beetroot to cool.
  • In a medium sized bowl mix together the marinade ingredients then add the cooled beetroot and stir well ensuring an even coating. Cover and set aside for at least half an hour or put in the fridge and leave overnight.
  • In a large bowl combine the remaining ingredients then spoon over the beetroot and half of the marinade mixture. Season to taste and serve.

Amy x