Category: Salads

Aubergine Pomegranate and Kale Salad [vegan]

Aubergine and Pomegranate are up there with my favourite ingredient combinations, and this salad pairs the two particularly well, even if I do say so myself! 

When aubergine is roasted to perfection, it melts in your mouth, not cooked enough and we all know the rubbery crunchy texture you have to endure, thinking if only we’d been a little more patient! Throw in some pomegranate to a mouthful of well-cooked aubergine and you’ve got yourself a pretty darn good mouthful of food!

This looks like one of those dishes that is far too faffy to make, but this middle-eastern inspired salad really is so simple to make and you’ll impress people with this dish fo sho!

Aubergine and Pomegranate Salad
Serves 2

1 aubergine (cut in half)
Half a pomegranate
1 tspn smoked paprika
1/4 tspn ground cinnamon
1/4 tspn cumin
1 tspn maple syrup
50g kale
100g couscous
Juice of 1 lemon 
Handful of parsley
Handful of coriander
2 tbsp tahini
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
Sea salt
2 tbsp olive oil

  • Cut the aubergine in half and score the flesh diagonally with a sharp knife. Pop on a baking tray and drizzle with half the olive oil and sprinkle with some sea salt.
  • Place in a pre-heated oven at 180C and roast for half an hour.
  • Meanwhile, cook the couscous; cover with boiling water, add the juice of half a lemon and leave the couscous to soak up the water, fluff with a fork after a few minutes. Massage the kale with with your fingertips using half a tablespoon of olive oil (this softens the leaves and makes it easier to eat raw).
  • Chop the parsley and coriander and add to the couscous, along with the kale, and the pomegranate seeds (save some to sprinkle on top when serving).
  • In a small bowl, add the smoked paprika, cinnamon, cumin and maple syrup and stir until it makes a paste. Once the aubergine has cooked for half an hour, remove from the oven and brush the flesh of the aubergine with the paprika paste and return to the oven for another fifteen minutes.
  • In a mug, add the tahini, apple cider vinegar, the other half of the lemon juice and four tablespoons of water and mix until smooth. (Stirring thoroughly is the key with a good tahini dressing and you’ll go through a range of textures until it is ready!)
  • Serve the aubergine on top of the couscous kale salad, along with the tahini dressing and extra pomegranate seeds.

Enjoy!

Veronica x

Pumpkin and Kale Salad with Peanut Dressing [vegan]

Just because we’re well and truly into soup weather doesn’t mean we have to totally give up on salad, plus I’m totally not lying when I say this is the pumpkin and kale salad is nothing but delicious…it’s ALL about the dressing!

I’ve been swamped with work recently and just when I needed to be on my A game, BAM along comes a cold to laugh in my face, and one that I’m still battling the remnants of. So, I’m loading on vitamin packed foods and this will definitely ensure you’re packing in the nutrients needed to fight any germs that are always lurking at this time of year.

Squash and kale saladSquash and kale salad

Squash and Kale Salad
Serves 2 people

5 stalks of red kale (de-stalk)
1/2 medium pumpkin/squash 
1 red onion
8 cherry tomatoes (halved)
1 tbsp pumpkin seeds
1 tbsp sunflower seeds
1 tbsp olive oil
Handful of coriander

For the dressing:
2 tbsp sesame oil
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tspn peanut butter
1 tbsp maple syrup
1 tspn dried chilli flakes

  • Halve and de-seed the pumpkin or squash and roast in the oven with a drizzle of olive oil for half an hour or until soft.
  • Wash and de-stalk the kale and chop into fairly small pieces. In a large mixing bowl drizzle the kale with the olive oil and massage the oil into the leaves with your fingertips. Leave to soften for 15 minutes.
  • Toast the sunflower and pumpkin seeds in a dry frying pan on a medium heat for 5 minutes until slightly browned.
  • Slice the red onion and add to the bowl, along with the cherry tomatoes, pumpkin and sunflower seeds.
  • Finely chop the coriander leaves and stir through.
  • In a small bowl, add the sesame oil, soy sauce, peanut butter and maple syrup along with the chilli flakes and stir until smooth.
  • Once the pumpkin is soft, add it into the salad and pour the dressing all over it and stir to coat it all.

Enjoy and keep well!

Veronica x

Sweet Potato & Quinoa Salad

I don’t know about you but I find it hard to come up with inspiring lunches to get me through my work days. All too often I reach for a tub of houmous and some oatcakes or a boring salad with some greenery, cucumber and tomatoes, nothing that exciting to look forward to (although I do love a tub of houmous). But I’ve really been working on livening up my salads. I work in the middle of nowhere and the nearest shops are a five minute drive away, and I’m reluctant to head to M&S for an expensive lunch. I’ve been working on a new evening routine that means I spend a little time preparing a tasty lunch, yes, it does mean taking time out of your evening, but trust me you’ll be thanking yourself at lunch time the following day! I encourage you to join me and try this salad it’ll have you counting down the hours until your lunch break. In fact, this recipe will make enough for three or four days, so if you’re happy with eating the same thing for a few days you’re laughing!

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Sweet potato & quinoa salad with lemon tahini dressing
Makes 3-4 servings

80g quinoa
280ml water
50g almonds
20g sunflower seeds
1 sweet potato
3 garlic cloves
Olive oil
2 tsp tahini
1/2 juice of lemon
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 romaine lettuce
A handful of cherry tomatoes
Quarter of cucumber
Handful of coriander

  • Heat a drizzle of olive oil in a baking tray in an 180C oven. Chop the sweet potato into cubes and along with the garlic cloves, throw in the baking tray. This takes about half an hour to cook.
  • Meanwhile, bring the water to boil in a saucepan and add the quinoa, simmer for 15 minutes, then drain and rinse with cold water. 
  • In a frying pan, lightly toast the almonds and sunflower seeds for 5 minutes on a medium heat.
  • Chop the lettuce, coriander, tomatoes and cucumber and put in a large bowl.
  • In a mug, mix together the tahini, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar and olive oil until smooth, season with salt and pepper.
  • Mix the quinoa in with the salad. Once the sweet potato is cooked add that to the bowl and then stir through the dressing and the almonds and sunflower seeds. Keep refrigerated.

Happy salad days!

Veronica x

Kohlrabi, Kale & Black Rice Salad

January is a funny old month. We’re trying to break old habits and exercise more, eat better, sleep longer… But it’s a cold, dark month and maybe sleeping more is really the best suited resolution for January!!!

Last week I wrote not about a new year’s resolution as such but about setting a positive intension for the year which included to nourish myself. Cue healthy salad recipe… ha! But I don’t just mean with food, obviously that’s part of it. But also to nourish my mind and body, maybe by spending less time on social media and more time meditating. More time strengthening and practising yoga. More time traveling and experiencing new things. Those kind of nourishing things.

We’re one month into the new year and it’s been going fairly well so far. I’ve been receiving treatment for an ongoing bad back and a niggling knee injury that brought any of last years cycling ambitions to a complete end. I’m doing daily strengthening exercise to rebalance and realign my posture which has been the cause of both injuries. I’ve practised mindfulness daily and I’m still struggling with the social media bit…. but I’m not going to be too hard on myself : )

Food-wise I’ve been eating pretty well for the last year or so. I’ve cut down heavily on refined sugar, wheat, alcohol and any processed foods. I eat a balanced diet, jam-packed with local, seasonal vegetables! What’s more I really feel the difference. The feeling after eating a fresh, flavour-packed, filling meal to a processed meal or snack laden with sugar of wheat is unbelievable. Light and energised or heavy and sluggish, this is what has helped me easily sustain a healthy balanced diet.

The great thing about having transitioned to a healthy, nourishing diet is that I don’t feel guilty about having the odd, not-so-nourishing meal or snack. I know that for 80-90% of the week my body is thanking me for eating well with energy and concentration levels to suit. So if time gets the best of my healthy, advanced food preparation or I’m in a situation where being vegan means my only option is chips, its ok and I don’t have to feel bad, I can just move on knowing the next thing I eat will probably be much more nourishing. 

We got there in the end… cue healthy salad recipe, for the 80-90% of the week when you want something fresh, flavour-packed and filling to leave you feeling light and energised. This salad will definitely not disappoint!
Kohlrabi kale and black rice saladvegan winter salad

Kohlrabi-and-kale-salad copy

Kohlrabi was one of those strange vegetables I have never encountered until I signed up for a weekly, local and organic veg bag. I was like, kohl-you-what-now!? So I did the usual thing I do with unknown vegetables, roast them and hope for the best… and it was ok. It wasn’t until I discovered this recipe using raw kohlrabi from Love and Lemons that I realised kohlrabi is totally amazing! 

I have made many a meal inspired by the spicy kohlrabi noodles from Love and Lemons, depending on what other vegetables are to hand. I wanted to share this version (my new favourite) before the kohlrabi season comes to an end. They should be back by around mid-late summer, so not too long to wait if you do miss this season.

Kohlrabi, Kale & Black Rice Salad
Serves 2-3

100g Black rice
1/2 Large kohlrabi
Large handful of cavolo nero or kale
1 Carrot
Handful of tender stem broccoli 
2 tbsp rice vinegar
1tbsp rapeseed oil
Red chilli to taste
Handful of fresh coriander 
2 tsp sesame seeds

For the kohlrabi marinade:
2 tbsp soy sauce or tamari
2 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tsp rice mirin
Juice of 1 lime
A few slices of red chilli, to taste
1 clove of garlic, crushed
1cm piece of ginger, grated

  • Mix all the ingredients for the marinade together in a large mixing bowl. Peel and finely slice the kohlrabi into thin match sticks and add it to the marinade, and mix thoroughly. Place in the fridge whilst you prepare the rest of the dish.
  • Place the rice in a saucepan and pour over roughly double the amount of boiling water. Bring to the boil and simmer for around 40 minutes until tender. (Check the rice now and then to make sure it doesn’t boil dry, adding a little water when necessary.)
  • Wash the cavolo nero or kale and slice down wither side of the tough stem and discard. Roughly chop the remaining leaves and place in a large mixing bowl. Add the rice vinegar and rapeseed oil and massage into the leaves until they start to soften then set aside.
  • Wash the broccoli and steam over the rice or over a pan of boiling water for 10-15 minutes until just tender. Rinse immediately under cold water to stop it cooking any further.
  • Wash and peel the carrot then, peel into ribbons.
  • Once the rice is cooked, rinse through cold water to cool. 
  • Remove the kohlrabi from the fridge and add the kale, carrot, chopped coriander and rice, and mix together. Spoon into a large serving bowl. Arrange the broccoli pieces on top, pour over the remaining marinade, sprinkle with sesame seeds and sliced chilli and serve.

Amy x

Warm Brussels Sprout & Pomegranate Salad

Two things, brussels sprouts and pomegranates. First the sprouts. Yes, that’s right, sprout season is here which means of course, it’s f-ing Christmas! Which I’m actually really excited about and am totally ready to embrace, even though it’s only November… but I need something, anything to get me through these cold dark, days!! Secondly, pomegranates. Yep, not so seasonal. Well not to aforementioned cold, dark Britain. But it’s like having a clementine in your Christmas stocking, sometimes you just need something exotic to brighten up your lump of coal…

(Actually there is a third thing… I did not know they are called brussels sprouts. I thought it was brussel sprouts and now I’m totally freaking out…)

Pomegranate

Anyway, no, I’m not saying that brussels sprouts are like coal. I love them! Just not how my Mum used to cook them, sorry Mum! November, for me, is a tough month. It’s dark, like all the time. If I don’t go out at lunch time I’ll pretty much never see the light of day. The beautiful colours of Autumn have all been blown off the trees and everything has turned kinda grey-brown. And unless some snow comes our way, things are gonna be grey-brown for a long time!

WarmBrussel&PomegranateSalad

So I need a little sparkle in my salad. A little festive cheer to get me through the day. And what better than a pomegranate! If you check the label you should be able to find some in the shops from the not-so-far-away Egypt or Turkey… I know, but it’s better than Peru or China!

Brussel-&-Pomegranate-Salad

And yes, now that Veronica and I have taken over Christmas dinner duties, we no longer serve our brussels boiled. (Again, sorry Mum! She’s literally going to kill me, or at the very least give me an evil stare which is possibly worse.) Frying them or roasting them is the way to go. Plus, now we both get seasonal veg boxes every week, sprouts are no longer just a thing for Christmas day. Oh no, the sprout season in the UK can run from September to February. That’s a whole lotta sprouts!

This simple recipe works great as a side for a roast, or yes Christmas dinner. Or cook up a little quinoa and stir it through to make it a delicious meal all on its own. (British grown quinoa of course!)

Warm Brussels Sprouts & Pomegranate Salad

350g Brussels Sprouts
1 Onion or 1/2 a Leek
1 Small Garlic Clove
Half a Pomegranate 
3 tbsp Chopped Walnuts
1/2 tbsp Rapeseed Oil

For the dressing

1 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp white wine vinegar
1 tsp maple syrup 
Pinch of all spice
Pinch of cinnamon

  • Trim the base of the brussels and peel off the outer layers, wash and half them.
  • Heat a frying pan to a high heat and toast the walnuts for a few minutes, remove from the pan and set aside in a bowl. 
  • Add the brussels to the pan, turn down the heat slightly and add a few tablespoons of water to the pan to slightly steam them. Meanwhile slice the onion or leek. Once the water has boiled, add the onions and turn up the heat again. Keep stirring whilst you fry on a high heat until the onions and brussels begin to brown.
  • Add the garlic and stir through for a minute. Transfer the brussels into a serving bowl along with the toasted walnuts and leave to cool slightly.
  • In a small bowl or cup mix together the ingredients for the dressing and pour over the brussels.
  • Cut the pomegranate in half across the middle. Hold half the pomegranate cut side down over a large bowl. Bash the skin like crazy with a spoon until all the seeds fall out into the bowl.
  • Sprinkle the pomegranate seeds over the brussels and serve warm.

So get out your frying pan out and tell November to do one, we want Christmas!

Amy x

Roasted Beetroot & Raw Green Salad

This week is all about beetroot – you may have seen this tasty looking Chocolate Beetroot Cake Amy made last year…

Chocolate Beetroot Cake

Well the recipe has made it into the final of PETA’s Great Vegan Bake-Off with this delicious cake and we are alongside some tasty looking creations, so we need your vote, because winning would be amazing! Voting is open until the 18th September, so please click through and place your vote (for us incase that wasn’t clear!)

GVBO-Finalist-Button

Thanks!! 🙂

So back down to business, the thing with beetroot is it’s underrated. I’m ashamed to admit that it wasn’t that long ago until I didn’t realise the only way to eat it wasn’t out of a jar full of vinegar ready sliced or out of those plastic trays. We didn’t buy fresh beetroot, why bother when it’s already been cooked for you?! How wrong I was!

I have grown my own and now we get bundles delivered in our veg box. It can be delicious just simply grated in a salad like this, or indeed made into a cake. But, in my humble opinion roasting this vegetable brings out the sweetness and takes out the more earthy taste that can put some people off it – not me though I love this vegetable no matter what way it is cooked, plus the leaves make a great addition to this super tasty salad.

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Roasted beetroot and raw green salad with garlic tahini dressing

(Serves 2)

A handful of kale
A handful of beetroot leaves
A handful of spinach
Olive oil
2 medium sized beetroots
Garlic clove
Thyme
1/2  tin of chick peas
A handful of pumpkin and sunflower seeds

For the dressing
3 tbsp tahini
1 clove of garlic (crushed)
Juice of 1/2 lemon
75ml water
Salt & pepper

1. Preheat the oven to 180C , in a roasting pan drizzle some olive oil and heat for 5 minutes. Slices the beetroot into chunks then add to the roasting pan along with the garlic clove, chick peas and sprinkle some dried thyme over the top, roast for 50 minutes.
2. In a bowl mix together the tahini, lemon juice, garlic and water.  Stir until the dressing is mixed together and smooth, then season with salt and pepper.
3. Wash and dry the kale, spinach and beetroot leaves then drizzle with olive oil then massage into the leaves – this ensures the kale isn’t as tough to eat.
4. In a pan toast the pumpkin and sunflower seeds for a few minutes.
5. Once the beetroot is cooked, mix together with the leaves then drizzle with the tahini dressing. Sprinkle the seeds over the top.

Ok, yes it is a little more work than opening a jar of beetroot but give a little time and a little effort and this nutrient filled vegetable can be something truly scrumptious.

Veronica x

 

Peppery Radish Salad

One of the things I love about summer is salads. I know…..salad….boring! Wrong. You’ve just got to make it more interesting. Now we’re well and truly into summer I’m starting to get some more vegetables in my veg box to make my salads that little bit more exciting.

One thing I love about getting a veg box is the variety of lettuces we get to eat. I’m not talking about your typical iceberg or your cos lettuce here, oh no sir-ee. I’m talking flavoursome salad leaves, peppery leaves, unidentifiable leaves…..basically you’ve got to get some flavour in the base layer of your salad.

This week we also received a bundle of vibrant pink radishes. They look just how radishes should look, all different shapes and sizes, slightly different to the uniform round ones you get in the supermarket. These taste so good.RadishesAny good salad isn’t complete until you’ve got the dressing. This is where you make or break it. Often I just drizzle a little olive oil or balsamic vinegar but nothing beats putting a little bit of effort into making a tangy dressing.DSC_0022DSC_0040

Peppery Radish Salad

Serves 2

A couple of handfuls of lettuce (washed)
4-5 radishes (washed and sliced thinly)
1 cup puy lentils (cooked and cooled)
1/4 cucumber (sliced as you prefer)
1/2 raw beetroot (grated)
A handful of fennel leaves
2 tbsp pumpkin seeds
2 tbsp sunflower seeds

For the dressing:
1 tsp dijon mustard
1/2 garlic clove (crushed)
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar

1. In a large bowl add your lettuce, radishes, cucumber, and seeds. Mix together.
2. Once cooled, add the lentils to the lettuce and mix together along with the beetroot, and fennel leaves.
3. In a cup, add the garlic, mustard, oil and vinegar and stir thoroughly. Drizzle over the salad and stir to coat all the leaves.

This is perfect to eat for lunch or box it up and enjoy for a couple of days at work.

Happy salad days.

Vx

Celeriac & Marinated Beetroot Salad

Marinated-beetroot-salad

It’s been so cold here lately that all I’ve been eating is soups and stews. It’s the kind of weather where even two pairs of gloves won’t keep your hands warm and your skin is constantly dry no matter how much shea butter you apply.

So why then, I here you ask, am I posting a salad recipe? Good question…

Beetroot-and-celaric-salad

Because I miss summer!!!! I miss it so much! Bring back the warmth of the sun please!!

Ok, I’m being a bit dramatic but I know you all feel my pain! The other reason is that this week I got a surprise bag of British watercress in my veg bag, which I wasn’t expecting at this time of year. And then I was like, wooaahh, remember when it was warm and sunny and all I ate was salads. I miss those days.

So bring a little green, fresh, tangy, salady joy to these cold winter days. Then have a cup of tea to warm yourself back up : )

Beetroot-and-celaric-winter-salad

Celeriac and marinated beetroot salad

2 medium sized beetroot
1/2 a small celeriac
1 bunch watercress
2 tbsp chopped walnuts

For the marinade:
2 tbsp white wine vinegar
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp olive oil

  • Peel and chop the beetroot into large chunks.
  • Wrap the chopped beetroot in foil, seasoned with a little olive oil and salt and pepper and roast at 180C for 30 minutes or until a knife easily cuts in.
  • Leave the beetroot to cool.
  • In a medium sized bowl mix together the marinade ingredients then add the cooled beetroot and stir well ensuring an even coating. Cover and set aside for at least half an hour or put in the fridge and leave overnight.
  • In a large bowl combine the remaining ingredients then spoon over the beetroot and half of the marinade mixture. Season to taste and serve.

Amy x

Roasted fennel salad

If you are  a regular reader you may have (or you may not) noticed we have been a little quiet around here for the last few weeks. We hadn’t planned to have a two week break, but we both went on holiday (yay!), getting our butts into gear and planning posts doesn’t always come strongly around here! We both tend to write our posts on Sunday evenings ready to go live the next day!

I haven’t been doing so well on my clean eating lifestyle, sugar has been creeping back into my diet, and I spent two weeks on holiday consuming my body weight in pizza, pasta and prosecco – and what a great time I had!

Now it’s back to reality, life goes on and it is time to get back into my clean eating. In our veg box this week we got a lovely fennel. Roasted fennel is one of my new favourite flavours and this warm fennel salad is so tasty you just have to try it! This salad makes a perfect weekend lunch or make it to take to work. It is full of flavour thanks to the lemon and thyme.

Fennel

Thyme

Roasted fennel

Roasted fennel and vegetables

Roasted fennel salad

Warm fennel salad

Roasted fennel salad
Serves 2-3

Half a fennel bulb
2 cloves of garlic
1 red onion
3 tomatoes
A handful of fresh thyme
1 lemon
1 tbsp coconut oil
Half a courgette
Watercress
100g bulgar wheat

1) Set the oven to 160C , chop the fennel into slices, in a large roasting tray melt the coconut oil, then add the fennel, chopped onion and cloves of garlic. Chop the tomatoes and add to the tray. Add the sprigs of thyme and squeeze the lemon and throw in the rest of the lemon wedges. Roast in the oven for 30-35 minutes, remember to  stir it around every now and again.
2) Cook the bulgar wheat in a saucepan, as per the packet instructions, it usually takes 15 minutes and the water soaks into the wheat.
3) Once the fennel, onions and tomatoes are roasted, remove from the oven and remove the sticks of thyme, the leaves should just fall off into the pan. Add the bulgar wheat and stir through the vegetables. Place back in the oven for another 5-10 minutes.
4) Season with salt and pepper and serve with watercress and thinly slice some courgette. You can remove the garlic cloves if you prefer, but I love to eat roasted garlic. Serve with the lemon wedges.

Enjoy this delicious warm salad

Veronica x

 

Peashoots, micro veg, salads and the return of the flies.

Last month I told you how I had started off this year’s growing season slowly by sprouting lentils. Well this month I’ve taken baby steps to up my game with reasonable success. I’ve been growing micro veg and peashoots and they’ve been packing a flavour punch in my salads for the last week or so.

Beetroot couscous and peashoot salad

Micro veg by the way is just the hipster term for sprouting seeds like radish, broccoli or mustard and harvesting them when their first set of leaves form, before they develop into actual plants. Now why, I hear you ask, might you want to grow tiny unformed vegetables. Well not only are they perfect to grow indoors as they take up very little space and are very quick to grow. They are also full of flavour and nutrients, having a higher nutrient content than their fully grown vegetable counterpart.

Homegrown peashoots

Window sill gardening

I have grown two pots of peashoots and one small tray of both radish and mustard as micro veg. This really is a easy way to grow at least something to contribute to what you eat each week. I find they come in especially handy when you’re trying to throw together a lunch but don’t really have much in the cupboards.

Peashoots

What you’ll need:
Some pots, I’ve got some made from old rice bags but you could use any pots you have to hand.
Some organic, peat free compost.
Some dried green peas. You can normally find big bags of dried peas for next to nothing in most grocery shops.

How to grow:
Sow dried peas, tightly packed in your pot. You can probably do them even closer together than I have.
Cover with a thin layer of compost and water generously.
Keep on a warm sunny window sill and make sure the soil doesn’t dry out.
Harvest in around 2 weeks.

How to use:
I love them raw in salads but you can also steam or wilt them and use them as greens.

Grown your own peashoots

Peashoots

Micro veg

What you’ll need:
A few trays, you can use old takeaway containers or anything you have to hand.
Some organic, peat free compost.
Some seeds of vegetables such as radish, mustard, broccoli, cabbage, kale, fennel or beetroot.

How to grow:
Sow seeds closely and gently press them down into the soil.
Water generously after sowing.
Keep on a warm sunny window sill and make sure the soil doesn’t dry out.
Harvest in 5-7 days.

How to use:
I love to add them to my salads but you can also use them in sandwiches or use them as a garnish on soups.

Mustard sprouts

Now when I said I’ve had reasonable success, yes, the shoots have been really easy to grow, taken up only one window sill and provided delicious tasty additions to my salads but… I have had another invasion of tiny flies! Darn them! The good thing is that shoots have such a fast turn around that I can harvest them quickly and don’t have to feel bad about getting rid of a more established plant.

I have now harvested the radish and mustard sprouts, whose soil seems to be the main breeding ground for the little buggers. I hope that getting rid of this soil from my flat will mean there is nowhere left for them to breed so they will die out. I will try and keep my peashoots on for now as there are still some shoots coming up but I know if the flies move over to them, I will just harvest them and get rid of that soil too. Oh the troubles of gardening in a flat.

I’m not deterred though. As the weather continues to warm up the soil will become too hot and dry for the flies to be able to breed there. So I am living in hope that I will be able to grow something more substantial over the hotter months. But for now I shall continue with baby steps and enjoy my lovely salad.

Peashoot salad

peashoot salad

I think these two salads make the perfect lunch together. The punchy flavours from the micro veg and raw leek are perfectly balanced by the sweetness of the beetroot and carrot.

Serves 2

Peashoots, micro veg, leek and walnut salad

About 16 peashoots
Two handfuls of micro veg. (I used one handful of radish and one of mustard.)
1/4 of a leek
Small handful of chopped walnuts.
Lemon juice
1/2 tbsp olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

  • Very finely slice the leek and mix it together in a bowl with the peashoots and microveg, a good squeeze of lemon juice, the olive oil and salt and pepper.
  • Toss everything together thoroughly as this will help draw out some of the water from the leek which will just take that raw edge off of it.
  • Set aside.

Beetroot, carrot and couscous salad

80g wholewheat couscous
1 tsp vegan bouillon stock
Boiling water
1 medium-small beetroot
1 small carrot
2 tbsp sunflower seeds
1 tbsp sesame seeds
1/2 tbsp olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

  • Start by cooking the couscous. Put some water on to boil and stir together the couscous and bouillon powder together in a bowl and pour over enough boiling water to just cover the couscous. Cover with a plate and set aside for 5 mins.
  • Shred the carrot and beetroot using the fine grater attachment on a food processor or grate into a bowl.
  • Fork through the couscous and stir in the shredded veg and the seeds.
  • Drizzle over the olive oil and season to taste.

Spoon out the two salads into serving bowls and enjoy.

Salad Peashoots and sprouts salad

Amy x