Category: Mains, Soups & Stews

Beetroot & Black Bean Burgers

We love eating by the seasons and seeing how the passing of the year brings a whole different array of food to our tables. Living in the heart of a city I particularly love the connection my local veg box gives me to the changing seasons, weather and produce. There’s nothing like a wet, muddy carrot to spark the connection between the weather we’re having to the food that’s growing, or maybe that’s just me… vegetable romantic?

At this time of year, when the winter veg starts running out and the new season crops haven’t quite kicked in, it can seem like there isn’t that much exciting produce around. For sure there are plenty of greens to be had but when it’s still decidedly wintery outside, it can be hard to get excited about salad and I actually LOVE salad. But I don’t see this as the down-side to eating by the seasons. I see it as the fun, challenging side. How can I make the most delicious, satisfying, yummy meal out of a cabbage…. uh hello Winter Veg Stir-fry!

In fact I’ve actually had people say to me, oh yeah it seemed good getting a local veg box at first but then we just ended up getting loads of beetroot and just didn’t really know what to do with it. Well it just so happens that we bloody love beetroot (is that some kind of beetroot joke there, blood… who knows) and we don’t want beetroot putting anyone off eating seasonally!

We really do love it, just check out these recipes…

Chocolate Beetroot Cake
Roasted Beetroot & Raw Green Salad
Roasted Beetroot Rissotto
Celeriac & Marinated Beetroot Salad
Vegetable Crisps

So I wanted to share a really exciting, super delicious, hearty recipe to inspire those who might think eating seasonally is boring and restrictive and show that it is exciting and most importantly delicious! 

Beetroot-and-black-bean-burgers Vegan-beetroot-burgers

Beetroot & Black Bean Burgers
Makes 8 burgers

3 large beetroot (approx. 650g)
1 cup uncooked black beans
150g oats
1 tsp sweet paprika
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dill

Serving options:
bread rolls
salad leaves
alfafa sprouts
fried onions
fried chestnut mushrooms 

  • Soak the black beans overnight in double their volume of water. (I often don’t plan ahead to do organised stuff like this so just cook them for double the amount of time).
  • Rinse and drain the beans and place them with fresh water in a saucepan. Cook on a medium heat, covered for 1 hour until tender and soft.
  • Once your beans have started cooking, pre-heat the oven to 180C before peeling and chopping the beetroot. Place in a baking tray, drizzle with a little oil, sprinkle with the dill and season with salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly and cover with foil, roast for 45 minutes then set aside to cool slightly. 
  • When the beans are cooked drain them and run under cold water to cool. Add them to a food processor with the beetroot, oats and spices. Pulse for a couple of minutes, scraping down the sides regularly until you have a fairly smooth consistency.
  • Shape into burgers and place on a lightly oiled baking tray. Place in the fridge for 30 minutes which help gives them a firmer consistency. You can skip this step if you don’t mind them a little squishy, or are really hungry.
  • Bake in the oven for 25 minutes at 180C, flipping hallway through. Serve in bun with toppings of your choice and a large side salad. Or skip the gluten and serve with sweet potato wedges.

Amy x 

Kohlrabi, Kale & Black Rice Salad

January is a funny old month. We’re trying to break old habits and exercise more, eat better, sleep longer… But it’s a cold, dark month and maybe sleeping more is really the best suited resolution for January!!!

Last week I wrote not about a new year’s resolution as such but about setting a positive intension for the year which included to nourish myself. Cue healthy salad recipe… ha! But I don’t just mean with food, obviously that’s part of it. But also to nourish my mind and body, maybe by spending less time on social media and more time meditating. More time strengthening and practising yoga. More time traveling and experiencing new things. Those kind of nourishing things.

We’re one month into the new year and it’s been going fairly well so far. I’ve been receiving treatment for an ongoing bad back and a niggling knee injury that brought any of last years cycling ambitions to a complete end. I’m doing daily strengthening exercise to rebalance and realign my posture which has been the cause of both injuries. I’ve practised mindfulness daily and I’m still struggling with the social media bit…. but I’m not going to be too hard on myself : )

Food-wise I’ve been eating pretty well for the last year or so. I’ve cut down heavily on refined sugar, wheat, alcohol and any processed foods. I eat a balanced diet, jam-packed with local, seasonal vegetables! What’s more I really feel the difference. The feeling after eating a fresh, flavour-packed, filling meal to a processed meal or snack laden with sugar of wheat is unbelievable. Light and energised or heavy and sluggish, this is what has helped me easily sustain a healthy balanced diet.

The great thing about having transitioned to a healthy, nourishing diet is that I don’t feel guilty about having the odd, not-so-nourishing meal or snack. I know that for 80-90% of the week my body is thanking me for eating well with energy and concentration levels to suit. So if time gets the best of my healthy, advanced food preparation or I’m in a situation where being vegan means my only option is chips, its ok and I don’t have to feel bad, I can just move on knowing the next thing I eat will probably be much more nourishing. 

We got there in the end… cue healthy salad recipe, for the 80-90% of the week when you want something fresh, flavour-packed and filling to leave you feeling light and energised. This salad will definitely not disappoint!
Kohlrabi kale and black rice saladvegan winter salad

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Kohlrabi was one of those strange vegetables I have never encountered until I signed up for a weekly, local and organic veg bag. I was like, kohl-you-what-now!? So I did the usual thing I do with unknown vegetables, roast them and hope for the best… and it was ok. It wasn’t until I discovered this recipe using raw kohlrabi from Love and Lemons that I realised kohlrabi is totally amazing! 

I have made many a meal inspired by the spicy kohlrabi noodles from Love and Lemons, depending on what other vegetables are to hand. I wanted to share this version (my new favourite) before the kohlrabi season comes to an end. They should be back by around mid-late summer, so not too long to wait if you do miss this season.

Kohlrabi, Kale & Black Rice Salad
Serves 2-3

100g Black rice
1/2 Large kohlrabi
Large handful of cavolo nero or kale
1 Carrot
Handful of tender stem broccoli 
2 tbsp rice vinegar
1tbsp rapeseed oil
Red chilli to taste
Handful of fresh coriander 
2 tsp sesame seeds

For the kohlrabi marinade:
2 tbsp soy sauce or tamari
2 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tsp rice mirin
Juice of 1 lime
A few slices of red chilli, to taste
1 clove of garlic, crushed
1cm piece of ginger, grated

  • Mix all the ingredients for the marinade together in a large mixing bowl. Peel and finely slice the kohlrabi into thin match sticks and add it to the marinade, and mix thoroughly. Place in the fridge whilst you prepare the rest of the dish.
  • Place the rice in a saucepan and pour over roughly double the amount of boiling water. Bring to the boil and simmer for around 40 minutes until tender. (Check the rice now and then to make sure it doesn’t boil dry, adding a little water when necessary.)
  • Wash the cavolo nero or kale and slice down wither side of the tough stem and discard. Roughly chop the remaining leaves and place in a large mixing bowl. Add the rice vinegar and rapeseed oil and massage into the leaves until they start to soften then set aside.
  • Wash the broccoli and steam over the rice or over a pan of boiling water for 10-15 minutes until just tender. Rinse immediately under cold water to stop it cooking any further.
  • Wash and peel the carrot then, peel into ribbons.
  • Once the rice is cooked, rinse through cold water to cool. 
  • Remove the kohlrabi from the fridge and add the kale, carrot, chopped coriander and rice, and mix together. Spoon into a large serving bowl. Arrange the broccoli pieces on top, pour over the remaining marinade, sprinkle with sesame seeds and sliced chilli and serve.

Amy x

Winter Vegetable Stir-fry

Happy new year! I’m sure most of us are currently knee deep in resolutions, detoxes and all things puritanical or have you given in already? After all the Christmas indulging and the hope of a new year it’s understandable why we feel the need to start afresh and try to be the best us we can be, even if we know our good intentions will only last for a few weeks. So in the spirit of the new year, new you thing, let’s try to think of some things that aren’t too restrictive and are small changes that make a positive impact on not only your life but others too.

Stir-fry

Have you heard of Veganuary? It’s when you go vegan for the month of January. We think it’s a great idea and fully support people that sign up for it (it’s not too late to sign up)! But, maybe you’re not ready to go vegan for a whole month and it all seems a little too daunting. Why not try one day a week, then two, then three….you get the idea? Or try cutting down on your cheese intake, maybe replace your dairy milk with a dairy-free alternative…baby steps.

Sign up for a local veg box scheme, we’re always banging on about how great they are, so maybe now is the time to get some awesome seasonal organic veggies into your life? 

Do you struggle to cook from scratch and know you’re eating too much processed rubbish? Set a day aside a week, where you make a meal from scratch, where you know exactly what has gone into it, no hidden sugars, not full of salt and way more tasty. We’ve got loads of ideas for you in our recipe section and I’ve got a super yummy stir-fry for you this week, that you can make in 15 minutes flat.

stir-fry

Winter Vegetable Stir-fry
Serves 2

1 tbsp coconut oil
6 leaves of savoy cabbage
1 onion
1 leek
2 cloves of garlic
1 chilli (chopped)
1 thumb piece of ginger (grated)
1/2 lime juice
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp sesame seeds
Dried chilli flakes
Drizzle of sesame oil
2 x bundles buckwheat soba noodles

I find the key to a great stir fry is the prep – get all your vegetables chopped and ready to go, because then we can cook quickly!

  • In a pan melt the coconut oil over a medium heat, in a seperate pan bring some water to the boil (for your noodles). Once the water is boiled cook the noodles for as long as the instructions say (mine take about 6 minutes).
  • Once the coconut oil is melted, add the onions and garlic and cook for a couple of minutes. Turn the heat up and add the cabbage and leek, making sure to stir frequently. Add the ginger, soy sauce, lime juice and chilli and cook and stir thoroughly. If your heat is high, you should only need to cook for a maximum of 5 minutes.
  • When your noodles are cooked serve in a dish alongside the cabbage stir fry, drizzle with sesame oil, some more sesame seeds and dried chilli flakes.

Super simple, super tasty.

Here’s to an awesome, healthy 2016!

Veronica x

Sage & Chestnut Patties with Parsnip Bacon

Parsnip-Bacon

We’ve been having a pretty relaxing few days, even cooking two Christmas dinners we’ve managed to stay calm (apart from when Mum poured cashew cheese over the Christmas pudding instead of cashew cream!). Whilst we’ve been enjoying lots of delicious festive food like these cheese and crackers, these brussels and this Christmas cake, we haven’t really been over indulging.

Veronica is still struggling with her Candida and is trying to stay as sugar-free as she can manage over the festive period. She’s also started her marathon training. I on the other hand have been out of action with a bad knee for weeks and have only just started being able to do yoga again. I’m itching to get back on my bike and am gutted not to be able to go out running with Veronica whilst I’m back home. So I’ve been trying not to over indulge so I don’t make myself feel anymore sluggish than I already do. 

So how to indulge without over indulging? For me that means making delicious food that I wouldn’t normally go to the trouble of making or trying out new and exciting recipes. This recipe is exactly that. You’ve probably seen coconut bacon floating round pintrest and blogs over the past year. I’ve been dreaming about topping my Christmas dinner with parsnip crisps in the way we used to put streaky bacon on the turkey before we were vegan. So when I saw this coconut bacon over on Top with Cinnamon with the extra addition of miso paste, I knew what had to be done… parsnip bacon! And what to top with parsnip bacon, sage and chestnut patties.

These patties make the perfect festive inspired meal without leaving you in a festive food coma. Served with the crispy parsnip bacon they remind me of deconstructed pigs in blankets, sans cruelty of course! The cauliflower mash is creamy and delicious without the heaviness of potatoes. Serve with some steamed greens and some chutney or gravy and you’ve got yourself one delicious dinner!

Sage-&-Chestnut-Patties 

Sage & Chestnut Patties with Parsnip Bacon and Cauliflower Mash

Serves 4

For the patties:
420g Whole chestnuts
150g Puy lentils
2 tbsp Dried sage
1 tbsp Flax seeds + 3 tbsp water
1 tbsp Vegan bouillon + 100ml water
Pinch of cumin
Polenta for coating

  • Pre-heat the oven to 170C, cut a cross in the shell of each chestnut and roast them for 30 minutes.
  • Rinse the lentils, bring them to a boil in a saucepan of water and simmer for 20 mins until tender then drain.
  • Grind the flax seeds and mix them together with the water and set aside to thicken.
  • Once the chestnuts are roasted, take them out of the oven and leave them to cool before shelling them.
  • Put the chestnuts into a blender and blitz until roughly chopped. Add the cooked lentils, flax mixture and remaking ingredients and blitz together. Season with salt and pepper and shape into 8 patties.
  • Sprinkle a plate with polenta and coat the patties. Leave them on the plate and chill them in the fridge for at leaf 30 minute before cooking.
  • Fry in a little coconut oil in a large frying pan on a medium-high heat for 10 minutes on each side until browned and hot through.

For the parsnip bacon:
Recipe adapted from Izy Hossack.

1 tbsp Miso paste
2 tbsp Rice syrup
1 tsp Smoked paprika
1 tsp Sweet paprika
1 tbsp Soy sauce
1 tbsp Coconut oil (melted)
2-3 Parsnips

  • Measure all the ingredients into a large bowl and mix together well, set aside.
  • Wash and peel the parsnips and trim the ends. 
  • Then peel the parsnip into thin strips using a peeler.
  • Add the parsnips to the bowl and mix together to ensure they are all well coated.
  • Lay the parsnip strips out onto a baking tray lined with greaseproof paper and bake at 170C for 20mins, checking and turning every 5 minutes to ensure they don’t burn.
  • Remove from the oven and they should crisp slightly more as they cool.

For the cauliflower mash:
1 Cauliflower (approx. 650g)
50ml Non-dairy milk
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 tsp Nutritional yeast

  • Boil the cauliflower for approx. 12 minutes on a medium heat until tender but not overcooked, remove from the heat and drain.
  • Place back in the saucepan with the remaining ingredients and season with salt and pepper. Using a stick blender, blitz the cauliflower until you get a silky, smooth mash. Serve immediately.

Enjoy the remaining festivities and we’ll see you in the new year!

Amy x

Chestnut Stuffed Squash

It’s easy to get overwhelmed thinking of all the things you need to do in the lead up to Christmas. Making gifts, buying gifts, wrapping gifts. Attending numerous Christmas parties, planning festive recipes, making, buying and wrapping even more gifts. So two weeks back, before Christmas-mode got into full swing, I escaped city life for a few days in the New Forest.

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Cue hats, gloves, scarves and walking boots. Jumping over streams, walking on fallen trees. Long lunches. Dark afternoons spent in cosy pubs lit by candles and heated by open fires. Yep you get it, the perfect winter break. Perfect that is, if you aren’t vegan.

IMG_4863new forest

I finally got it. This is why my boyfriend, and no doubt countless others don’t want to make the commitment to veganism. It’s not because they don’t agree with the environmental and ethical view points. It’s not because they don’t enjoy delicious and satisfying vegan food. It’s because it’s unbelievably frustrating going out for food and paying good money for completely uninspiring and sometimes frankly, tasteless food. 

Don’t get me wrong, I’ve had great experiences eating out, even in places that aren’t particularly vegetarian friendly, let alone vegan friendly. It’s just that that weekend I had a string of awful meals, one after another, after another. One of the main problems was that the vegetarian options on offer were cheese based and because they were pre-made could not be adapted and made vegan. The problem with the vegetarian options that could be adapted was that they completely lacked the thought and attention that the meat and fish options had clearly been given. And I suspected that the chefs making them would never eat those dishes themselves.

Ok rant over. But my point being, that if I wasn’t as passionately committed to my vegan lifestyle choice as I am, I wouldn’t want to pay to eat a half arsed, tasteless meal whilst everyone around me is tucking into a carefully prepared, deliciously balanced, flavour-packed meals. 

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So maybe the restaurant sector still has a way to go to offer and tempt people (ie. my boyfriend) to choose to pay for a vegan meal. And whilst it can seem like a massive commitment to alter your diet and have to start explaining to waiters or your friends that no you don’t eat fish or cheese or honey, it is easier to start at home. 

Buying fresh, whole ingredients and making yourself delicious flavour packed vegan meals is so easy. And at this festive time of year when we’re being bombarded with pictures of giant joints of roast meat, there are super tasty alternatives that capture the spirit and flavours of the season without harming animals, contributing to climate change and whilst benefitting your health.

This chestnut stuffed squash is exactly that.

Stuffed-SquashChestnut-Stuffed-SquashRoast-squash

Chestnut Stuffed Squash

Serves 4

2 small squash (eg. acorn, red kuri, harlequin)
200g cooked chestnuts
75g puy lentils
Rapeseed oil
1 red onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1/4 tsp dried thyme
1/4 tsp dried sage

  • Preheat the oven to 180C.
  • Cut both the squash in half, scoop out the seeds and place on a baking tray. Drizzle over a little oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 30 minutes.
  • Meanwhile prepare the chestnut filling. Rinse the lentils in a sieve then bring them to a boil in a saucepan before reducing the heat and simmering for approximately 20 minutes. They should be soft but still have a little bite to them.
  • Whilst the lentils are cooking chop the onion and fry in a little oil on a medium heat in a frying pan until they start to caramelise.
  • Roughly chop the cooked chestnuts into small chances. Add the dried herbs and garlic to the onions and stir through before adding the cooked lentils and chopped chestnuts. Cook for 5 minutes.
  • Take the squash out the oven and spoon the chestnut filling equally between the squash halves. Cover with foil and the squash back in the oven for 20 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven. Serve with a side of steamed greens or as the centre piece of your festive feast.

 

 

 

 

Spicy Squash & Kidney Bean Stew

You know when you’re absolutely shattered and you can’t be bothered to cook? I totally get it! We’ve got a one pot dish that isn’t too involved, that will mean you can serve up something warm and comforting on these dark autumnal evenings. Plus this will serve up to 6 people, so you can either eat it for a couple of nights or is great if you got a few more mouths to feed.

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Last weekend was a busy one, in fact I’ve been counting down the days to this weekend to recover from it! It was busy. Amy was here for the weekend and we spent Saturday and Sunday in the kitchen working on some exciting things! Then we had to cook dinner….the absolute last thing we wanted to do was cook a meal for 5 hungry people, so we needed something easy. This is what we created – a warm comforting stew that is tasty and won’t have you slaving in the kitchen for hours.

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Spicy Squash & Kidney Bean Stew

Olive oil
2 onions
2 garlic cloves
3 bell or sweet peppers (chopped)
5 potatoes (chopped into cubes)
2 tins of tomatoes
1 medium squash – I used Kabocha (chopped into chunked)
4 carrots (chopped into chunks)
1 1/2 cups cooked kidney beans (1 tin)
1 1/2 cups cooked black eyed beans (1 tin)
3 tsp cumin
2 tsp smoked paprika
1/2 tsp hot chilli powder
1 tbsp organic tomato ketchup
salt and pepper

  • On a medium heat, heat a drizzle of olive oil in a large pan and cook down the onions for 5 minutes until soft.
  • Crush the garlic cloves and add to the pan. Add the cumin and paprika and cook for a couple of minutes.
  • Add the squash, potatoes, carrots, pepper and beans and coat with the spices. Pour in the tomatoes and bring to the boil. Throw in the chilli powder and ketchup and simmer for 30-40 minutes.
  • Season with salt and pepper.

We served it with couscous, mainly because we’d run out of rice, but also because it’s super quick to make. Although, to be honest you could just eat it on its own (although I’m a big fan of double carbing)!

Enjoy this super tasty, warming, throw it in a pan kinda meal that will definitely have you licking your plate (er…I totally don’t do that)!

Peace out.

Veronica x

Creamy Leek & Potato Soup with Polenta & Walnut Croutons

There’s nothing like soup on these chilly autumn days to warm you up and it only takes a little bit of effort to go from a basic soup to amazingly delicious, this is the best soup ever, soup.

Leek-&-Potato-Soup

This summer I went on an amazing and inspiring vegan permaculture course. I met some really amazing people and got introduced to some great, practical and positive ideas to create a regenerative, cruelty-free landscape and abundant future. (If you’re intrigued to know more next years course is now open for bookings.) One of the other amazing things about the course was the food, especially the soups. I had previously thought I made pretty tasty soups but these put mine to shame. So I decided it was time I upped my soup game!

Creamy-Leek-&-potato-soup

Recently I’ve been getting tonnes of leeks in my veg bag and having helped myself to a field of left over potatoes that were “too small” for the farmer to harvest, leek and potato soup was just calling out to be made.

But how to up my soup game? Creamy cashew goodness complemented by crispy polenta croutons of course!

Leek-and-potato-soup

Creamy Leek & Potato Soup with Polenta & Walnut Croutons

For the cashew cream
75g cashews, soaked for 4 hours, preferably overnight
100ml water
1 tbsp lemon juice

For the polenta croutons
60g dried polenta
375ml water
2 tbsp chopped walnuts
1tsp dill

For the soup
3 leeks
1 onion
2 cloves garlic
2 carrots
2-3 potatoes (approx 250g)
1/2 tsp cumin
1/2tsp dill
1 1/2 tbsp bouillon stock
1 litre water
1tbsp olive oil

  • Start by cooking the polenta in the water, according to the packet instructions. When the polenta is almost ready, stir in the walnuts and dill. Pour the thickened mixture onto a parchment lined baking tray and spread to about 1/2cm thick and set aside to cool.
  • Roughly chop all the veg for the soup. Add the onions to a large saucepan with a little oil and cook on a medium heat until they start to soften.
  • Then add the garlic, leek, carrot and potato and half cover the pan with a lid for about 5-10 minutes before adding the cumin and garlic.
  • Stir for a few minutes then boil the water and add to the pan along with the stock. Leave to simmer for around 30 minutes until the potatoes are soft.
  • Whilst the soup is cooking, prepare the cashew cream. Drain the cashews from the water the have been soaking in and rinse. Blend with 100ml of water and the lemon juice until completely smooth, this may take a few minutes. Set aside or make in advance and put in the fridge until your ready to use it.
  • Return to the cooled polenta and chop into crouton sized chunks. Cook under the grill on a high heat for around 10-15 minutes, turning occasionally until the croutons are evenly crisp on all sides.
  • When the soup is ready add in half the cashew cream. Then blend the soup until smooth, either in the pan using a stick blender or pouring it into a food processor.
  • Serve in warm bowls, spooning over more cashew cream into each bowl and topping with the croutons.

The subtle hint of cumin and dill really bring the flavour of this simple soup to life and the easy to make, cashew cream makes it rich and delicious. Add to this a bit of exciting crunch from the walnut and polenta croutons and you’ll never think soup as dull and boring again!

Enjoy!

Amy x

Squash Gnocchi

Squash

Autumn is all about those golden tones. Browning leaves, warm golden afternoon sunlight and a host of yellows and oranges that equals squash season. Yes, October is here and it’s time to think of a million and one uses for all the squash that is coming our way.

Squash-gnocchi

Squash gnocchiHang on a minute, October?? Is it just me that is freaking out at how quickly this year is going? It seems like everytime I sit down to write a post I’m like ‘Oh my god, where the hell is the year going!’ Well I’m doing it again…. argh!!

Keeping focused on the exciting things that October brings rather than the fact that it will be Christmas the next time you blink, this recipe is awesome! It has simple, subtle flavours and brings those golden colours of the season right onto your table.gnocchi recipe

Over the years of squash inundation that comes with getting a seasonal veg box, we’ve made stews, burgers and tagines. This recipe however, is one of my favourites. It’s not the first thing that springs to mind when you think of squash but it’s oh so delicious. Especially as I’m a massive gnocchi fan! This recipe has all the comforting goodness of gnocchi but with extra flavour and without the stodge.

It’s a simple recipe to make, although rolling out and shaping the gnocchi is a bit of a faff. However, it can easily be made in advance, simply store the uncooked pieces in the fridge for a few hours or even freeze them for a few months.gnocci

Squash Gnocchi

Serves 3

450g Squash (Harlequin, Crown Prince or any that you can find)
175g Brown Rice Flour
1 tbsp Flax Seeds
3 tbsp Water
1 tbsp Nutritional Yeast
10 Cherry Tomatoes
2 Large Handfuls of Spinach
1 Clove of Garlic
Olive Oil

  • Begin by chopping the squash into smallish chunks and cutting or peeling off the skin.
  • Place the squash on a baking tray, drizzle with olive oil and season. Roast for around 30mins at 180C until soft when you cut with a knife.
  • Set aside to cool slightly. Meanwhile make the flax egg by grinding the flax seeds in a spice grinder or food processor and whisk together in a cup with the water. Leave for around 5 minutes until it becomes gelatinous.
  • Put the squash into a large mixing bowl and mash until only a few lumps remain.
    Add in the flax egg and combine, the slowly add in the flour and bring together.
  • Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and kneed gently adding a little more flour if necessary to form a smooth dough that isn’t too sticky.
  • Divide into 4 and roll each piece out with your hands to a form long, thin sausage.
  • Cut into 2cm pieces. Pinch the ends together with your fingers to create a slight crescent shape and imprint with the back of a fork.
  • Bring a large saucepan of water to boil, add in the gnocchi and simmer for 2-3 mins. When they rise to the top and float, they are done.
  • Whilst the gnocchi is cooking, wash and chop the spinach and tomatoes. Gently cook together in a frying pan with the garlic until the spinach wilts.
  • Spoon the gnocchi onto a warm serving dish using a slotted spoon and gently mix in the spinach and tomatoes.

Enjoy the changing colours of Autumn and all the delicious produce the season has to offer. No doubt we’ll be bringing you at least one more squash recipe between now and spring! : )

Amy x

Mallorcan Tumbet

We seem to be racing through August, yes it is August… You may have indeed forgotten it is actually Summer with all these cloudy grey days and rain. But luckily for us the crops are still managing to realise what season we’re in!

So yes, hello August, hello Mediterranean vegetables!

Summer-vegetables

There’s tomatoes, courgettes, peppers, aubergine galore. If you get a seasonal veg bag no doubt you’ve already had plenty of British grown med veg : ) If you don’t, get yourself down to your local farmers market and taste the delights, it’s a world away from the stuff you buy in a supermarket in the middle of winter imported from who knows where!

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Now the Mediterranean isn’t normally associated with vegan cuisine but I discovered a traditional vegan dish in Mallorca when on holiday there earlier in the year.

With all these wonderful Medeterrean vegetables in season in the UK, I can now finally recreate it at home. Wohoo!

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This dish is wonderfully simple but oh so delicious!!

Mallorcan Tumbet

1 aubergine
2 courgettes
1 onion
2 potatoes
6 medium sized tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato puree
3 cloves garlic
3 bay leaves
Olive oil
Good quality salt
Black pepper to taste

  • Begin by making the tomato sauce. Crush the garlic and gently fry in a large saucepan with a little olive oil for a minute or two.
  • Roughly chop the tomatoes and add to the pan, also add the bay leaves and tomato puree. Stir and leave on a low/medium heat with a lid askew. Leave to cook gently whilst you prepare the vegetables, checking and stirring occasionally.
  • Heat a large frying pan to a medium/high heat. Thinly slice the potatoes and fry them off until cooked and starting to brown.
  • Layer the potatoes in the base of an ovenproof dish and sprinkle with a little salt. Thinly slice the remaining vegetables.
  • Add a little more love oil to the frying pan before frying the onions until soft and starting to brown. Then layer on top of the potatoes and sprinkle with a little salt.
  • Repeat with the courgettes and then the aubergine, layering each in turn.
  • Return to the tomato sauce, season and pour over the layered vegetables. Press down with the back of a spoon to ensure the sauce soaks through all the layers.
  • Bake at 180C in a pre-heated oven for 15-20 minutes and serve with a side of wilted chard.

It’s pretty easy to forget that produce like courgettes and tomatoes only grow in a fairly narrow window in this country when we can buy them all year round in supermarkets. By eating locally grown food we can connect with our own region and climate, and truly value the variety and seasonality of local produce. Not only does home grown, local produce taste better, it makes you value the ingredients all the more and can inspire you to make something that extra special : )

Amy x

Stuffed Marrow

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Well we’re in the height of summer, although you wouldn’t believe it looking at today’s weather, it’s been freezing! I’m really enjoying the new variety of vegetables that are in season. This weekend we celebrated Amy’s birthday; we ventured to the local pick your own farm before heading home for all things cider and BBQ based. Whilst we were mainly picking the last of the strawberries and finding the best raspberries and redcurrants to bury into the freezer to get us through the winter we also found some marrows.

 

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Marrows are one of those vegetables, which can be a bit boring. I’m a fan of boring and really like marrows but I can understand why some people may not really appreciate them quite so much. So, when life brings you marrow…..stuff them!

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Stuffed marrows with puy lentils and tomatoes

Serves 6

3 marrows
250g puy lentils
1 cartoon of passata
2 tbsp dried basil
2 cloves of garlic
Olive oil

1. In a saucepan cover the lentils with boiling water and simmer for 30 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, slice the marrows in half (lengthways) and scoop out the seeds (don’t throw them away)
3. In a roasting tin place the marrows and drizzle with olive oil and pop in the oven at 180C.
4. Dice up the marrow seeds and flesh and add to the lentil to cook down.
5. Once the lentils are cooked, drain and add the tomato sauce along with the garlic and season with pepper and basil.
6. Once the tomato starts simmering, take the marrow out of the oven and spoon the lentil mixture into the marrow. Return to the oven for 15 minutes. Serve with some green vegetables and mashed potatoes.
Enjoy!
Veronica x